News & opinion

News & opinion

Lack of conceptual similarity, by itself, weighs against existence of likelihood of confusion, finds General Court

A recent judgement by the General Court provides a useful reminder of the tests for assessing likelihood of confusion, as well as the evidentiary requirements for establishing the distinctiveness of a disputed mark. Florence Chapin sets out the case. 

By Florence Chapin,
Lack of conceptual similarity, by itself, weighs against existence of likelihood of confusion, finds General Court

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